Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Category: Short Posts

Short Posts
Welcome to my new and improved site

Hello everyone,
I am thrilled to announce I am re-launching JonathanLittlePoker.com!
Over the last five years, I have been super busy traveling the world playing high stakes poker tournaments, writing books (14 books total, at the moment!) and cultivating my training site, FloatTheTurn.com. I completely forgot about my personal site.
At my site, you can expect lots of FREE educational poker blogs as well as guest blog posts from some of the top poker players and mindset coaches in the game.
You can usually expect my blog posts to be longer than the articles I have produced in the past for various poker magazines, given they typically have a 900 word limit. There is only so much you can say in 900 words! My goal with this blog is to bring you fresh, enlightening content that you cannot find anywhere else in the world.
I also plan to post previews from my upcoming projects, especially when I need your opinion to help improve them. I probably won’t post too much about my day to day life unless you make it clear you want to hear about that. In general, my life is fairly mundane. I work a lot and play a little.
Given I now have lots of educational content to share with the poker world, I want to make the information as easily accessible to you as possible. Feel free to browse my books and video products using the tabs at the top of this page. If you want free poker training videos and exclusive new product information from me, I strongly suggest you sign up for my email list on the side of this page.
If you have any questions or comments at all, or if you find flaws with the site, PLEASE use the contact form. Your comments will help make this site the best it can be.
Thank you for checking out the site. I truly hope you enjoy what I bring to you. Be sure to follow me on twitter @JonathanLittle and check back often for updates.

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Rants, Short Posts
“Nice Hand”


I can’t believe I have to post this in 2014, given all of the excellent poker educational material available, but during a few recent tournaments, I was shocked and amazed to witness countless mediocre (possibly) professional poker players say “nice hand” in a condescending way to amateurs after they got lucky, taking the pro’s money.
I want to make it perfectly clear that this sort of behavior is unacceptable in every possible way. You make money because the weak players show up to play. If you make them uncomfortable or bring it to their attention that they played poorly, they could quite realistically stop playing or improve their skills, killing your edge.
Forrest has a great stare.
Whenever I see this type of behavior, I make a point to stare at the pro and give them a look that says “What are you doing? Are you a blatant idiot?” Sometimes they quickly get the point, if they are smart, and other times they continue to grumble, if they are dumb. I continue staring at them hard because they are clearly in the wrong and because I want poker to last forever. While I certainly don’t want to spend my time being a nanny to an immature poker player, you have to do what you have to do.
Whenever you experience a bad beat, you should simply sit there and do nothing. Don’t throw a fit in any way. You are not a baby. Elliot Roe, a poker mindset coach who does absolutely amazing work, mentions that most of this behavior originates from being able to get your way as a child by throwing fits. Some people learn that if they cry and complain, they will get their way. Obviously, this is not how poker works, even though it appears that this type of behavior does work decently well in the real world. If you have this sort of tilt issue, I strongly suggest you seek Elliot’s help at http://pokermindcoach.winatpoker.com/
While I understand that losing a large pot by getting unlucky is never fun, you must accept it as an integral part of the game. If the best player won every time, the game would quickly die. Notice that in chess, where the best player wins almost every time, no one plays for significant money whereas you can get 6,683 people to happily show up with $10,000 to play poker for a few days.
Do your part to keep the game profitable. If you are not generally nice, kind, and friendly at the poker table, you are not playing well.The post “Nice Hand” first appeared on Jonathan Little. .

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Short Posts
An interview with OnlinePoker.In

Recently I had the pleasure of answering some questions for Online Poker News, India. I thought this was a fun interview and I wanted to share it with you. Here are the questions:
It has been almost a decade you started playing poker. Could you run us through your poker background and the journey?
I started playing poker when I was 17 years old. I played $1 buy-in tournaments with friends but eventually decided that I was tired of losing with my tight, passive strategy. I read all of the poker books available on the market, around 30 at the time, and then deposited $50 online. I played limit hold’em, which was the main game 12 years ago, and worked my way up to $30/$60 while practicing sound bankroll management. I then switched to sit n’ go tournaments and did well at those.
I was 22 years old when I won the Mirage WPT.
When I turned 21, I started playing live tournaments. After a year of losing, I final tabled the PCA WPT event for $320,000. After that, I ran well and won 2 WPTs for $1,000,000 each and took 2nd place in another. Since then, I have been playing the circuit full time, usually winning or losing a modest amount each year. I also play a decent amount online. I have chopped the Sunday Million four-handed, took 3rd in the Sunday $500 twice, final tabled the $10,000 SCOOP high roller, and took 2nd in a $1,000 re-entry event on Full Tilt for $320,000. I recently took 2nd place in a $10 buy-in 17,000 person tournament. Online poker is fun!
I also spend a lot of time teaching inspired players how to succeed at poker. I am the author of six best-selling poker books, which you can find on Amazon. I am the owner and head video producer at FloatTheTurn.com. I also run a personal site, JonathanLittlePoker.com, where I post free educational blogs and podcasts.
Why did you decide to take up poker coaching?
I realized that I learned a ton from other players and I wanted to make it easier for new players to learn from me. I wanted to give back to the poker community. Also, the poker forums where I learned, as well as most books on the market, were full of outdated and even misguided information. I wanted to make sure that there was a place where people could get good, sound information without having to wade through a bunch of rubbish.
Do you study poker yourself also? Who do you follow or look up for poker advice?
I study poker every day. I read most of the books by players who I know are good at their games. I watch poker videos every day, usually when I am having lunch. I enjoy watching Phil Galfond’s PLO videos, as I am currently spending a decent amount of time studying that game.
Your books are generally a conversational style of writing with which it is easy for a poker player to associate. Why did you get into this style of writing?
I write as if I am talking to my student in a one-on-one setting. I want to make my books as easy to read as possible while still giving excellent, concise information. A lot of people write books or make training videos to try to sound smart. I do it to help people. You will help more people if you write in a language they can easily understand.
What is so unique about your poker training site?
At FloatTheTurn.com, in addition to offering over 500 hours of great poker content from some of the best players in the game, I, as well as a few other coaches, host a monthly webinar where the members can go online and ask us all of their poker questions. This gives you access to excellent professionals a few hours per month for the small cost of $10. Since I charge $300 per hour for private coaching, $10 per month is a bargain.
You release webinars, audiobooks and podcasts on a weekly basis. From where do you get so much inspiration to work on dispensing poker knowledge?
I enjoy working and producing content because I know it will improve the lives of my students. I realize how hard my students work and I want to work hard for them. If you enjoy doing something, you won’t view it as work. I love every second of helping people who have a desire to improve their poker and their life.
What according to you are the top 3 tips for a poker player? Something like a rule of thumb!
Keep a large bankroll.
Pay attention to the action on all hands, not only the ones you are involved in.
Study everything you can find from people who are good at the game you are trying to learn.
Could you tell us a bit about your future plans? Planning a book?
I always have lots of projects in the works. I am decently good at juggling lots of things. My next book, Jonathan Little on Live No Limit Cash Games Volume 2, will be released sometime in March.
How can ShareMyPair fill the void of a hand replayer? Is it very important for a poker player to get his hands analyzed for future learnings?
It is very important to study the hands of other players, as well as your own. Before ShareMyPair, it was difficult to view hands from world-class professionals without being there in person. It is also difficult to recall all of the details of your own hands. Now, lots of professionals, myself included, post their hands on ShareMyPair for the whole world to see. They are also more than happy to answer your questions about the hands, effectively giving you free poker lessons.
Thanks for reading! If you want a FREE training video where I discuss 5 concepts you MUST master to win at poker tournaments, sign up for my email list on the side of this page.

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Short Posts
Learning from Phil Hellmuth Jr.

I was recently honored to host a live webinar with 13-time WSOP bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth Jr. While Phil is a bit of an enigma in the poker world because no one quite understands how he wins on a consistent basis in high stakes poker tournaments, I knew there were countless skills I could learn from him. When you have the opportunity to discuss poker strategy with one of the most successful poker players in the world, you listen!
Since the webinar, I have implemented numerous concepts we discussed, drastically increasing my profits at the table.
One of the most important concepts he discussed was the idea that if you have played poker for a long time and studied the game diligently, as I have, you should tend to trust your reads. Since our webinar, I have worked hard on my reading abilities and they seem to be paying off.
I recently played in a $13,000 high roller event in Barcelona. There was one player at the table who was obviously splashing around. Everyone was making a point to play pots with him. Even though he was clearly playing junky hands, he always had the nuts when his opponents decided to call his large postflop bets.
Eventually I raised with A-T from middle position, the splashy guy called in the small blind and the Big Blind also called. The flop came 4-4-3. The splashy guy made a bet and I decided to call. The turn was a J. He bet again and I called. The river was an 8 and he bet enough to put me all-in, which was around the size of the pot.
Seeing how he had only shown the nuts when he took overly aggressive lines in the past, this would normally be an easy fold. However, something did not feel right. I can’t quite quantify what it was, but he looked nervous. I thought he would play numerous busted draws in this manner. My main concern was that he could be bluffing with a hand such as 2-2 or A-Q, which would be a disaster for me.
However, I went with my read and called. He showed the 5-2 and I doubled up with my marginal A-high.
While this is certainly an extreme example, if I did not have the amazing learning experience with Phil, I would have folded. Instead, I won $13,000 in equity.
To get instant access to this enlightening learning experience with Phil Hellmuth Jr. where he discusses numerous other strategies he implements to constantly win poker tournaments, check out the webinar here: Learning from Phil Hellmuth Webinar

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Long Posts, Short Posts, Training Videos, Video Blogs
My Weekly PokerStars Home Game

My Home game is currently on hold and games are not running. If there is enough demand, I will re-start the home game in the future.
*****Sign up info is no longer active*****
PokerStars Home Game:
Club ID: 1976954
Invitation Code: playpoker
Weekly Prizes:
These prizes are awarded each week to the top three finishers of my home game tournament.
This is important!!! If you win one of the prizes, you must email support@jonathanlittlepoker.com your full name, twitch name, pokerstars name, and email address to claim your prize.
1sT:
5 Reward Stars for my video training products
2nd:
3 Reward Stars for my video training products
3rd:
1 Reward Star for my video training products
Poker Coaching Account
In order to redeem your rewards, a PokerCoaching.com account is required.  If you do not have an account, sign up for a FREE Poker Coaching account using the link below.
Free Account
https://members.pokercoaching.com/start_trial.php
How to Redeem Your Rewards
Click the video below for instructions on how to redeem your rewards.

How to sign up:
You can NOT sign up through PokerStars New Jersey, only the global clients PokerStars.net and PokerStars.com.
To sign up for the PokerStars home game, simply download PokerStars and then navigate to the Home Game tab.

Click “Join a Poker Club”.

Then enter:
Club ID: 1976954
Invitation Code: playpoker

I then have to manually accept you, which may take me up to 24 hours. Once I have accepted you, be sure to log back into PokerStars and register for the tournament. You will see JonathanLittlePoker under your list of poker clubs.

Then click on JonathanLittlePoker, click on Schedule, then you will see the upcoming tournaments.

Simply register for the tournaments you want to play and you will be all set.

Log into PokerStars prior to the tournament and the table should automatically pop up once the tournament begins. I am looking forward to playing with you. Please please please share this post with your friends. I want this league to be a huge success so I can continue running it. Thank you and good luck!
This game was initially run as a league, with Kuno2001 claiming the title as well as the $1,500 grand prize. I will start the league back up again sometime after the WSOP, assuming there is enough interest.

HUGE congrats to Biszibosz for winning $1,000 plus lots of additional prizes in Season 2. Congrats to Qtunneler for taking 2nd for $500 plus lots of prizes.
I was honored to have a coaching session with the first and second place players from Season 1 of the league. Here I am giving them their coaching sessions live in Las Vegas!

***For those interested, here is how the PokerStars point structure works:
The exact formula for how Home Game statistics are calculated is based upon these factors:
n = number of players in tournamentk = place of finish (k = 1 for 1st place, k = 2 for 2nd place, etc.)p = integer (n * 0.34)
‘p’ determines who receives points. ‘p’ is the number of places that finish in the top third of the tournament. If there are 6 entrants, then n=6, therefore p=n*0.34, making p=2 (integer of 2.04).
If n = 4, 2 points are awarded for 1stIf n = 5, 3 points are awarded for 1st
For n 5, points awarded are:
n * (sqrt(n)/sqrt(k)) / [sum (sqrt(n)/sqrt(k)) for k = 1 to k = p]
Each tournament with 6 or more players pays out the total number of points equal to the number of entrants (n). The numbers generated by the above equation tend not to equal ‘n’, in these cases the points are normalised accordingly, by keeping the same ratio but applying it to n, rather than n.
So if there are 6 entrants n=6, p=2. As p=2.04, only the top 2 finishers will receive points, meaning the equation will work like this:
For 1st, n=6, k=1, p=2.04:
6 * (sqrt(6)/sqrt(1)) / [(sqrt(6)/sqrt(1)) + (sqrt(6)/sqrt(2)) + (sqrt(6)/sqrt(6*0.34))]6 * (2.449/1) / [(2.449/1) + (2.449/1.414) + (2.449/2.04)]6 * 2.449 / (2.449 + 1.732 + 1.71)= 2.49
For 2nd, n=6, k=2, p=2.04:
6 * (sqrt(6)/sqrt(2)) / [(sqrt(6)/sqrt(1)) + (sqrt(6)/sqrt(2))]6 * (2.449/1.414) / [(2.449/1) + (2.449/1.414)]6 * 1.732 / (2.449 + 1.732 + 1.71)= 1.76
These results are then normalised so that 6 points are awarded in total (as each tournament awards ‘n’ points):
For 1st place:
6* (2.49 / (2.49 + 1.76)) = 3.51points
For 2nd place:
6* (1.76 / (2.49 + 1.76)) = 2.49 points

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Products, Short Posts
Strategies for Beating Small Stakes Poker Tournaments

I am pleased to announce my book, Strategies for Beating Small Stakes Poker Tournaments. One of the most asked questions I receive on a regular basis is something along the lines of “I know you can teach me to beat decent players who play in a reasonable manner, but how do you suggest I beat overly bad players who play in small stakes tournaments?”
(for cash games, check out Strategies for Beating Small Stakes Poker Cash Games)I quickly realized a short article or blog post would not provide enough room to expound on the various adjustments you should make when your opponents will make gigantic errors on a regular basis. So, I decided to compile my knowledge into a concise ebook.
In Strategies, I expound on a wide array of flaws that plague small stakes players. I dig deep and show you how to get well out of your comfort zone in order to exploit the mistakes your opponents are making. If you develop a game plan for how to attack each specific player at your table, you will be able to adjust your strategy to increase your win rate.
If you know someone who is struggling with small stakes tournaments (which should be most of the players who play in local casinos on a regular basis who never seem to be able to build a bankroll) please share this book with them. In order to make the book accessible to everyone, I have priced it, at least currently, at only $4.99. I am confident that if struggling small stakes players study and follow the advice I provide in Strategies for Beating Small Stakes Poker Tournaments, they will instantly see an improvement in their poker skills.
P.S. I want to thank everyone for the huge amount of support with this project. Thank you all for the amazing reviews and making Strategies #1 in all of the gambling and poker sections on Kindle. I greatly appreciate it. Without you, none of this would be possible.
I have decided to make Strategies available in the audio-book format. You can actually get two of my audio-books for FREE! For details, check out JonathanLittlePoker.com/free

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Articles, Short Posts
Maximizing marginal top pairs

In December of 2014, I had the pleasure of traveling to Prague for both the World Poker Tour and European Poker Tour events. Compared to the players in the United States, European players are generally much more aggressive. The following hand, from a €1,000 buy-in event, beautifully illustrates how to take advantage of these aggressive players without opening yourself up to losing a bunch of chips when they happen to have a premium hand.
The blinds were 75/150. A relatively tight, aggressive kid who seemed to play a straightforward strategy raised to 400 from first position out of his 20,000 effective chip stack. The player in 3rd position, a splashy, somewhat wild French guy, called. I decided to call with Ah-Qh in the cutoff seat. While most players would reraise before the flop, I called because I would be quite unhappy if the initial raiser continued in the pot because I expected him to only raise with premium hands from first position. Calling also has the added benefit of ensuring I get to see a flop in position with a disguised hand against the wild player.
The flop came As-6d-2h. The initial raiser checked, which probably means he missed the flop or has an underpair, such as K-K or 9-9. The French guy bet 1,000 into the 1,425 pot. I decided to call. Calling allows me to easily fold if the initial raiser decides to check-raise while also forcing the French guy to continue to the turn with a likely wide range. While raising both for value and to protect my hand from various draws may seem like the most obvious play, it allows the French guy to fold his marginal hands I have crushed, such as A-4 or 6-5. The last thing I want to do is allow the French guy to get off the hook with hands that are drawing thin. As expected, the initial raiser folded.
The turn was the (As-6d-2h)-3c. The French guy bet again, this time 1,800 into the 3,425 pot. I decided to call because, as on the flop, I feared that if I raised, he would be able to easily fold most worse hands. That being said, raising may have a bit of merit because my opponent may view a marginal hand, such as A-9, as the nuts and pile his stack into the pot. However, since I would have no clue how to proceed if he reraised or even called, I think calling is by far the best play.
The river was the (As-6d-2h-3c)-6h. My opponent quickly bet 3,200 into the 7,025 pot. Even though I could easily be crushed, I also beat a lot of hands, primarily worse top pairs. I made the easy call. I was surprised to see my opponent turn up 10-8 offsuit for absolutely nothing.
If I raised at any point throughout this hand, either my opponent would have folded his hand that was drawing dead or applied a huge amount of pressure, perhaps resulting in me making a snug fold with my strong, but not premium hand. By calling, I forced him to stay in the pot out of position with a hand that was drawing dead, which is always an excellent result. I also gave him the opportunity to bluff off a lot of chips, which fortunately for me, he did. The next time you find yourself in a pot with a strong, but not premium, made hand, consider calling instead raising, especially against players who are capable of attempting a bluff.
It is important that you get well out of line in order to take advantage of the mistakes that you think your opponent is likely to make. If you fail to see what is likely to happen ahead of time, you will not be able to properly adjust. If you try to play a solid default strategy against everyone, you are certainly leaving a ton of money on the table. For a more thorough analysis of how to get well out of line in order to exploit your opponent’s tendencies, such as bluffing too often or playing too passively, be sure to check out my best-selling book, Strategies for Beating Small Stakes Poker Tournaments.
Thank you for reading. If you enjoyed this post, please share it with your friends.

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Articles, Short Posts
Finding folds at the WSOP

Those who know my game well know I don’t particularly like to fold reasonably strong hands. While being a bit of a calling station works well against most good, aggressive players who almost always have at least some bluffs in their ranges, against weaker opponents who play blatantly straightforward and rarely bluff, calling down with good, but not amazing, hands can get you in a ton of trouble. This WSOP has provided me with numerous examples where I should simply lay down a hand to a weak, passive player that would be criminal to fold against someone with a balanced range.
The first example took place in a $1,500 WSOP event. The blinds were 25/25 and everyone had around 4,500 chips. I raised with Kc-Qd to 75 from middle position and both the small blind and big blind called. Both of my opponents were around 55 years old and had yet to take any sort of an aggressive betting line. The flop came Ks-Ts-6d. My opponents checked to me and I bet 150. Only the big blind called. The turn was the (Ks-Ts-6d)-2c. The small blind checked and I decided to bet 300 for value. To my surprise, he made it 1,000 with little thought. I reluctantly folded and he proudly showed me his Kh-Th.
While most good players could, and likely should, have flush draws and marginal made hands they decided to turn into bluffs in their range, a tight passive player is almost never bluffing. Knowing this, which hands would he realistically check raise large for value and, in his mind, protection? I imagine the worst hand he may think is a “premium” hand on this board would be K-J. If that is the worst possible hand he can have, K-Q is in awful shape. It is worth noting that you will occasionally fold the best hand but against his tight value range, K-Q is crushed. Even if he had a few premium draws in his range, K-Q still simply must be folded.  When your opponent’s range is almost entirely premium made hands, if you have a good, but not premium, made hand, you should usually fold.
Another hand came up a little while later in the same tournament. This time, the blinds were 150/300-25 with 15,000 effective stacks. A tight, passive player raised to 750 from the small blind and I elected to call in the big blind with Js-Tc. The flop came Jh-Jd-9h. My opponent bet 900 and I called. The turn was the (Jh-Jd-9h)-6c. He checked and I quickly tossed in 1,500, hoping to look as if I was trying to blatantly steal the pot. When he check raised to 4,000 with confidence, I assumed the way I put my chips in the pot induced him to run an optimistic bluff. I elected to call, hoping he would shove the river. The river was the (Jh-Jd-9h-6c)-8s. My opponent instantly went all-in for 9,000 and I called with little though, losing to his 6d-6s.
So, where did I go wrong? Some people may think I should have raised the flop for “protection” but if the opponent only has a few outs, you should not be concerned with getting outdrawn, especially if you suspect you will be able to extract an additional street of value later on the turn or river. I was also concerned that he would fold almost all hands worse than a 9 if I raised, which would be a disaster as I certainly want to keep him in the pot with various A and K high hands. Finally, I wasn’t entirely sure I could profitably get in 50 big blinds against this specific player if he elected to reraise on the flop.
I messed up badly on the turn. I thought he would view my splashy bet as a bluff whereas in reality, he probably wasn’t paying attention to how I put my chips in the pot in the least bit. If he had nothing, he would fold and if he had a good hand, he would call. It is as simple as that. I then compounded my error by assuming my opponent would lose his mind and attack my splashy bet, which he probably wasn’t even aware of. This made me think my opponent’s range consisted of almost entirely hands I crush. In reality, he simply has a J or better every time. When he instantly pushed on the nasty 8s river, which improved Q-T and J-8 to better hands, I should have found a fold because I lose to all value hands besides perhaps a vastly overplayed overpair. I leveled myself about as hard as possible.
I know that most players know to not pay off tight, passive players, but I seem to forget it from time to time. When someone who hasn’t put a chip in the pot in an aggressive manner all of a sudden wants to stick his whole stack in, you need an overly premium hand to continue. Don’t forget it.
If you are going to the WSOP, I strongly suggest you spend some time preparing. If you simply show up and expect to succeed, you are almost certain to fail. I recorded a six-hour long training series for you that explains all of the preparations I make in order to ensure I have the best chance to do well. I also discuss how to play with the wildly varying stacks you will be forced to play with at the WSOP. Check it out here: Jonathan Little’s WSOP Coaching Series
Thanks for reading and good luck in your games!
This article initially appeared in CardPlayer magazine.

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Long Posts, Short Posts
Five pictures from my 2015 WSOP

For those who do not know, I somewhat regularly post pictures from my travels on Instagram. You can follow me there at Jcardshark. In this blog post, I will share with you five of my favorite photos I took during the 2015 WSOP. I hope you enjoy them!

This is me and poker legend Mike Sexton! My newest book, Jonathan Little’s Excelling at No-Limit Hold’em was released during the 2015 WSOP. We had a huge book signing at the GripsedPoker booth with lots of the authors attending, including Mike Sexton, Phil Hellmuth, Ed Miller, Matt Affleck, Evan Jarvis, Chad Holloway, Patricia Cardner, and Elliot Roe. It was a great time! If you haven’t checked out this massive 500-page book that took me over a year to complete, you can get it here. The book is amazing. You will not be disappointed.

This was my chip stack as we were heading to the final table in the $5,000 buy-in 8-handed WSOP event. I was fortunate enough to go to the final table with nearly the chip lead but unfortunately, it did not help. I busted in 6th place for $85,616. As you can see, I had loads of chips. Very rarely do you get one stack of green 25,000 chips, let alone three stacks!

Every year, my parents come out to the WSOP to hang out with me and play a bit of poker. My dad always competes in a few WSOP events. This year, he earned his second WSOP cash in the $1,500 bounty event. He took 91st place out of 2,178 players. He also collected a boatload of bounties. Unfortunately, we both played and subsequently busted the $10,000 buy-in main event within four hours. Bad beat!

After busting the WSOP main event, I played the $10,000 re-entry event at Bellagio. I sat down at my table next to a guy who I thought was completely unknown to me. Then, he pulled out this exotic “card protector”. I instantly remembered numerous things I was doing to exploit him a few weeks earlier in a random WSOP event. I strongly suggest you do not do anything that blatantly draws attention to you, especially if you are an amateur player who wants to remain nondescript. This trinket cost him a ton of equity and he didn’t even know it.

One of my goals during the WSOP was to sell my main Vegas house. As high stakes tournaments have migrated to Europe, I found myself spending less and less time in Vegas. I had a fully furnished house just sitting there. Seeing how I will likely need money for an expensive place in NYC once I get married on 8/1/2015, I decided to sell it to get some money for a down payment. While cleaning out the house, I found my old notebook where I kept diligent records of my daily play. This page lists all of the $215 sit n’ go tournaments I played around 5/29/2006. I drew a tally mark each time I completed a game, noting the place I finished, either first, second, third or out of the money. I then did some simple math to figure out how much I won or lost each day. During that week, I played 515 games and made $11,200 profit. Those were the good old days!
I hope you have enjoyed these images. Remember, to get your copy of Excelling at No-Limit Hold’em, and give it a read. You will not regret it. Also, please share my website with your friends. That is by far the most helpful thing you can do for me. Be sure to check back next week!

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คาสิโน ออนไลน์888
ทางเข้า คาสิโน
คาสิโน 1688
คาสิโน 1988
คาสิโน ทรูวอลเล็ต