Monday, August 02, 2021

Category: Deaths (Obituaries)

Baseball, Billy, Boston Red Sox, Conigliaro, Deaths (Obituaries), Tony (1945-90)
Billy Conigliaro, Keeper of His Brother’s Baseball Flame, Dies at 73


Billy Conigliaro, the first draft pick in Red Sox history, who started out in the Boston outfield with his star-crossed brother Tony and later spent years taking care of him after a heart attack, died on Wednesday at his home in Beverly, Mass. He was 73.His death was announced by the team. No cause was given.Though he wound up winning a World Series ring with the Oakland A’s in 1973, Billy Conigliaro was always a part of New England lore, forever connected by his local roots and the tragic events surrounding his older brother.Born less than 10 miles from Fenway Park in Revere, Mass., on Aug. 15, 1947, Billy Conigliaro was chosen fifth overall out of Swampscott High School in 1965, in Major League Baseball’s inaugural amateur draft.He made his big-league debut as a pinch-runner in April 1969, the same month his brother returned after almost two years from a beaning that had derailed his All-Star career.Five days after that, Billy made his first start, hitting two home runs in Boston. He hit another the next day, but he had just one more that season.His best season was 1970, when he played 114 games and batted .271 with 18 home runs and 58 runs batted in. The next season, he hit 26 doubles and 11 home runs in 101 games.Overall, Billy Conigliaro played 247 games for the Red Sox through 1971. He was sent to the Milwaukee Brewers in a 10-team trade in 1972 and abruptly retired. He returned with Oakland in 1973 and played three games in the World Series as the A’s beat the Mets. A knee injury ended his career after that season.Conigliaro played his first two big-league seasons alongside his brother, an enormous star for a franchise that hadn’t won the World Series since 1918.Tony Conigliaro made his debut for Boston in 1964 at 19 and won the American League home run title the next year. A month after playing in the 1967 All-Star Game, with Boston on its way to a championship, he was hit in the cheekbone by a fastball from the Angels’ Jack Hamilton. He suffered extensive injuries, including permanent damage to his left eye.He returned to the major leagues in 1969 and, despite limited eyesight, hit 20 home runs that year and 36 in 1970, playing alongside his brother.Tony Conigliaro was working as a sportscaster in San Francisco when he auditioned for a broadcaster job with the Red Sox in 1982. By all indications, he was set to get the job when he had a heart attack while Billy was driving him to the airport in Boston.He later had a stroke and was in a coma. Billy devoted much of his life to caring for him until Tony’s death in 1990 at 45.For the past 31 years, Billy Conigliaro had served on the committee for the Tony Conigliaro Award, given annually by the Red Sox to a major league player who “has overcome adversity through the attributes of spirit, determination, and courage that were trademarks of Tony C.”His survivors include his wife, Keisha, and a brother, Richie.

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง

Bela, Black People, Chicago (Ill), Deaths (Obituaries), Dianne, Durham, Gymnastics, Karolyi, Women and Girls
Dianne Durham, Barrier-Breaking Gymnast, Dies at 52


Dianne Durham, the first Black woman to win the U.S.A. Gymnastics national championship, who was later denied a shot at the Olympics by an ill-timed injury, died on Feb. 4 in Chicago. She was 52.Her sister, Alice Durham Woods, confirmed the death, at Swedish Hospital on the North Side, attributing it to an unspecified “brief illness.”After winning the junior national champion in 1981 and 1982, Durham was considered among the best female vaulters in the world when she entered the 1983 senior championship.She was known for rocketing her tiny frame — 4-foot-7 and 100 pounds at 15 years old — high into the air off a vaulting horse. Commentators also extolled her grace, as showcased by her balletic floor exercise in the 1983 championship.On the uneven bars during that competition, she knocked her left foot against a bar, prompting a CBS Sports reporter to ask her whether the injury would hamper her in the events to come. “I’ll be having too much fun,” she answered.As she went on to flip and spin her way to a dominant victory, a sportscaster announced, “It is Dianne Durham day.”Durham became the top-ranked female gymnast in the country and a front-runner for the 1984 Los Angeles Summer Olympics. Ebony magazine ran a glowing profile of her a few months after her win, noting that she had “a chance at not only becoming the first Black woman to make the Olympics gymnastic team, but the first Black to win a gold medal in the sport that has been dominated by Whites since it became an Olympic sport in 1896.”“Comaneci is history,” the magazine said about the Romanian Nadia Comaneci, then the sport’s most famous athlete and a former pupil of Durham’s coach, Bela Karolyi. “It’s Dianne Durham’s turn for the spotlight.”That dream crashed when, after a series of other injuries, Durham landed awkwardly during her vault in the 1984 Olympic trials and severely sprained an ankle. She still managed a score of 9.1 in the event, good enough to keep her in the running for the Olympics, but she was struggling to walk and withdrew from the rest of the competition.The Washington Post calculated that she was .24 points shy of the final spot on the Olympic team. Durham said later that if the stakes had been clear to her, she would not have withdrawn from the trials and instead pushed through the pain. She added that the selection committee’s decision not to include her was never fully explained to her.“This is a pretty big injustice to not have Durham on the Olympic team,” Karolyi told The Post. “The team needs her, the country needs her.”A training partner of Durham’s, Mary Lou Retton, went on that year to become the first American to win an Olympic gold medal in gymnastics and a “folk heroine,” as The Times wrote in 1984.But a profile of Durham on the ESPN website last year showed that many in gymnastics thought she had made her own lasting mark on the sport by proving that young Black women could reach its pinnacle.“The young Black gymnasts could look up to her,” Luci Collins, a Black gymnast a generation older, told ESPN. “They could see her and relate.”The lineage of female African-American gymnasts extending from Durham includes Betty Okino and Dominique Dawes, the first Black women to win Olympic gymnastic medals, in 1992; Gabby Douglas, the first Black Olympic champion in the all-around event; and the sport’s current star, Simone Biles.In a speech she gave while being inducted into a U.S. gymnastics regional hall of fame in 2017, Durham said her 1983 victory had “showcased to the entire country that a little Black girl from Gary, Indiana, could be the best gymnast in the country.”Dianne Patrice Durham was born in Gary on June 17, 1968. Her father, Ural, worked at Midwest Steel in labor relations, and her mother, Calvinita (Carter) Durham, taught elementary school.Dianne took up gymnastics at age 3 and before long started winning competitions. After claiming the 1981 junior championship at 13, she moved to Houston to train with Karolyi. Her mother soon quit her job and moved there as well.Durham retired from competition soon after the 1984 Olympic trials. In the early 1990s she was the assistant women’s gymnastics coach at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She found work doing choreographed gymnastic and dance routines and appeared in the closing ceremony of the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, Spain. She also performed at a theme park in Osaka, Japan.From 1996 to 2013, Durham ran her own gym, Skyline Gymnastics, on Chicago’s North Side. Some gymnasts she had trained won state and regional competitions. She also served as a judge at gymnastics events, including the national championship.She married Tom Drahozal, a school administrator and a girls’ basketball coach, in 1994. In addition to her sister, her husband and father survive her.Reflecting on her 1983 championship victory in her hall of fame speech, Durham gave much credit to her family and friends. Relatives had chipped in to help pay for her training in Houston as a young teenager. For the competition in Chicago, buses drove in from Gary carrying hundreds of supporters, members of Trinity Missionary Baptist Church, where a great-grandfather of Durham’s was one of the earliest deacons in the 1920s.At the meet, they held up a banner that read “We Love Dianne” and wore T-shirts with her name inscribed around a heart.“That support helped give me the extra edge I needed to win,” she said.

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง

Alzheimer's Disease, American Football Conference, Cleveland Browns, Coaches and Managers, Deaths (Obituaries), Kansas City Chiefs, Los Angeles Chargers, National Football League, Playoff Games, Washington Redskins
Marty Schottenheimer, 77, Winning N.F.L. Coach With Four Teams, Dies


After working in real estate following his retirement as a player, he turned to coaching in the N.F.L. He spent two years as the Giants’ linebacker coach and then was their defensive coordinator in 1977. He coached the Detroit Lions’ linebackers for two seasons after that before becoming the Browns’ defensive coordinator. He succeeded Sam Rutigliano as the Browns’ head coach midway through the 1984 season, when they were 1-7.Relying on a power ground game featuring Earnest Bynar and Kevin Mack and the passing of Bernie Kosar, Schottenheimer took the Browns to the American Football Conference final following the 1986 and 1987 seasons, but they lost to the Denver Broncos each time in their bid to reach the Super Bowl.The first time, the quarterback John Elway led the Broncos to a tying touchdown after they took over on their 2-yard line late in the fourth quarter, the sequence that became known as “the drive.” The Browns were then beaten on a field goal in overtime.The next year, in a play that became known as “the fumble,” Bynar was stripped of the football just as he was about to cross the goal line for a potential game-tying touchdown with about a minute left. The Broncos took a safety and ran out the clock for a 38-33 victory.Schottenheimer’s 1988 Browns team went 10-6 and lost in the first round of the playoffs. At the time, his brother, Kurt, was the team’s defensive coordinator, and when the owner, Art Modell, insisted that he reassign his brother, Schottenheimer quit. He had also resisted Modell’s demand that he hire a new offensive coordinator, having filled that role himself when it become vacant that year.Schottenheimer was the first to admit that he was strong-willed.“Maybe I thought there was a pot of gold somewhere else to be found,” he said in his memoir, “Martyball!” (2012), written with Jeff Flanagan. “But I was stubborn, very stubborn back then. I’ve always been stubborn but much more so when I decided to leave Cleveland.”He then began a 10-season run as coach of the Kansas City Chiefs, taking them to the playoffs seven times.

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง

Baseball, Cuba, Deaths (Obituaries), ESPN, News and News Media, Pedro Gomez, Television
Pedro Gomez, a Pillar of Baseball Coverage for ESPN, Dies at 58


Pedro Gomez, a mainstay of ESPN’s coverage of Major League Baseball for much of the past two decades who went from the newspaper sports section to millions of television screens, died at his home in Phoenix on Sunday, ESPN and his family said. He was 58.No cause of death was given by the network, which announced Mr. Gomez’s death late on Sunday night.“We are shocked and saddened to learn that our friend and colleague Pedro Gomez has passed away,” James Pitaro, the chairman of ESPN and Sports Content, said in a statement. “Pedro was an elite journalist at the highest level, and his professional accomplishments are universally recognized. More importantly, Pedro was a kind, dear friend to us all. Our hearts are with Pedro’s family and all who love him at this extraordinarily difficult time.”Tributes to Mr. Gomez, a son of Cuban refugees, poured in from across journalism and professional sports, including from several baseball franchises. Mr. Gomez’s son Rio Gomez plays for the Salem Red Sox, a minor league affiliate of the Boston Red Sox.“Devastating news about Pedro Gomez,” Jeremy Schaap, the veteran sports reporter and an ESPN colleague, said on Twitter. “Such a lovely, kindhearted, talented human being. So proud of his family.”Jason La Canfora, who covers the National Football League for CBS Sports, said on Twitter that he looked up to Mr. Gomez.“I was blessed to meet Pedro Gomez as a cub reporter in college, and further blessed to be able to call him a friend,” Mr. La Canfora wrote. “He represented the best of us, as journalists and human beings.”Mr. Gomez joined ESPN in April 2003 after spending 18 years as a baseball beat writer and columnist, including for The Miami Herald in his native South Florida, San Jose Mercury News, Sacramento Bee and Arizona Republic.During his career, he covered 25 World Series and 22 All-Star Games, according to an ESPN biography, which said he attended the University of Miami and majored in journalism.Mr. Gomez also chronicled some of the more sordid episodes of the national pastime. In 2007, there was Barry Bonds surpassing Hank Aaron’s home run record under a cloud of suspicion over steroid use. There was also the case of the Chicago Cubs fan Steve Bartman deflecting a foul ball during Game 6 of the 2003 National League Championship Series, which the then-Florida Marlins went on to win.In 2016, Mr. Gomez and his son Rio were profiled by ESPN for a Father’s Day feature. That same year, he traveled to Cuba to report on an exhibition game between the Tampa Bay Rays and the Cuban national team, the first time a Major League Baseball club visited there in about two decades.“Completely surreal to those of us Cubans and/or Cuban Americans,” Mr. Gomez said on Twitter at the time.During the trip, Mr. Gomez took his father’s and brother’s ashes back to his family’s homeland, ESPN recalled.Mr. Gomez was a member of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America and a voting member for the Baseball Hall of Fame.In addition to his son Rio, he is survived by his wife, Sandra Gomez; another son, Dante; and a daughter, Sierra.

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง

Ali, boxing, Deaths (Obituaries), Leon, Muhammad, Spinks
Leon Spinks, Boxer Who Took Ali’s Crown and Lost It, Dies at 67


Leon Spinks, who scored one of boxing’s greatest upsets when he defeated Muhammad Ali to capture the heavyweight championship in February 1978, but lost his crown in a rematch seven months later and never again found glory in the ring, died on Friday night n Henderson, Nev. He was 67.His death, in a hospital, was announced by his wife, Brenda Glur Spinks, in a statement released by the family’s public relations representatives. His family announced in December 2019 that he had been hospitalized for treatment of prostate cancer that had spread to his bladder.Spinks burst into view when he won the Olympic light-heavyweight gold medal and his brother Michael took gold in the middleweight division at the 1976 Montreal Games.Leon had fought professionally only seven times, with six victories and a draw, before facing Ali at the Las Vegas Hilton on Feb. 15, 1978, in a bout arranged by Bob Arum, one of boxing’s leading promoters.Ali held the World Boxing Association and World Boxing Council titles. But at 36, though an overwhelming betting favorite, he was past his prime. He weighed in at 224 pounds to Spinks’s 197.Spinks was a hard-charging brawler, but when he pressured Ali in the ring, the champion resorted to his rope-a-dope strategy, which was aimed at letting an opponent exhaust himself with punches that seldom did damage while Ali rested on the ropes.The Spinks corner had a strategy of its own, aimed at weakening Ali.“Jab, jab, jab, that was the plan,” Spinks’s trainer, George Benton, said in the dressing room afterward. “Hit him on the left shoulder all night with that jab.”Ali rallied in the 15th round, but Spinks warded him off and won a split decision.At the fight’s end, Ali had purple bruises above and below his right eye. His forehead was swollen near his left eye, and blood dripped from his lower lip.“He had the will to win and the stamina,” Ali said. “He hit pretty hard.”A few days after the fight, Spinks appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated, flashing what became a familiar gaptoothed smile.The World Boxing Council stripped Spinks of its heavyweight title for refusing to make a defense against Ken Norton, its designated challenger, and gave Norton the crown.Ali had envisioned a rematch with Spinks and promised to “keep movin’, don’t go to the ropes, be in better shape.” The strategy worked.In September 1978, Ali regained his W.B.A. title, defeating Spinks in a unanimous decision at the Louisiana Superdome before a crowd of some 63,000. This time he tied Spinks up when he charged at him, and he danced and jabbed like the Ali of old.By 1981, Larry Holmes held the World Boxing Council heavyweight crown. Spinks challenged him that June, losing on a third-round technical knockout. He faced Dwight Muhammad Qawi, the W.B.A. cruiserweight champion, in 1986, losing on a ninth-round technical knockout.His career by then was mostly in decline, and he had gained a reputation for partying in the midst of his training.Before the Holmes fight, Sam Solomon, who was Spinks’s trainer early in his pro career, recalled the weeks in the Catskills when Spinks was getting ready for his first Ali fight.“He’d go to bed at night and turn on his music box real loud and lock his door,” Solomon told The New York Times. “The only way I could find him was to trace his tracks in the snow.” That time, as Ali would soon learn the escapade didn’t harm his chances.Spinks’s last fight came in December 1995, when he lost a unanimous decision to Fred Houpe in an eight-round bout. Spinks was 42; Houpe was 45 and had not fought since November 1978.Spinks retired with 26 victories (14 by knockouts), 17 losses and three draws.Leon Spinks Jr. was born on July 11, 1953, in St. Louis, the oldest of seven children of Leon and Kay Spinks, who separated when he was a child. The family was poor and the neighborhood was tough. He would tell of receiving severe beatings from his father.A frail youngster, suffering from low blood pressure and asthma, Leon became a target of bullies.At age 13, he began boxing in a St. Louis gym program created to keep youngsters off the streets. He dropped out of high school in his junior year, joined the Marines, took part in their boxing program and thrived as an amateur in bouts leading up to the Montreal Games.Spinks had a largely unstable life after retiring from the ring. He said he had lost the money he earned, and he traveled around the country, seeking what jobs he could find. At age 52, he made a stop in Columbus, Ind., where he worked as a Y.M.C.A. custodian and unloaded McDonald’s trucks.Spinks fathered three sons with a girlfriend, Zadie Mae Calvin, who had grown up in his neighborhood.One son, Cory, became a welterweight champion, and another, Darrell, had 19 pro fights. His son Leon Calvin, who used his mother’s surname, won two pro bouts before he was shot to death at 19 while fleeing in a car from a party in St. Louis that had turned violent. Leon Calvin’s son, Leon Spinks III, fought in 16 pro bouts.In addition to his wife, his sons Corey and Darrell, his grandson and his brother Michael, Spinks is survived by seven other siblings: Karen (Spinks) Shanklin, Leland Spinks, Evan MacDonald, Eddie Brooks, Charles Spinks, Lionel Spinks and Patricia Spinks.On the night he dethroned Ali, Spinks said, he drew on the adversity of his childhood in summoning the strength to persevere.“My dad had gone around and told people I would never be anything,” Sports Illustrated quoted him as saying. “It hurt me. I’ve never forgotten it. I made up my mind that I was going to be somebody in this world. That whatever price I had to pay, I was going to succeed at something.”Gillian R. Brassil contributed reporting.

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง

Cincinnati (Ohio), Deaths (Obituaries), Tennis, Tony Trabert
Tony Trabert, a Two-Time No. 1 in Men’s Tennis, Dies at 90


Tony Trabert, who won five Grand Slam tournament titles in a single year, 1955 — three in singles and two in doubles — making him the world’s No. 1 men’s player for a second time, died on Wednesday at his home in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. He was 90. His death was announced by the International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, R.I., where he was inducted in 1970.A sturdy 6-foot-1 and 185 pounds, Trabert drew on a powerful serve-and-volley game and an outstanding backhand in capturing the 1955 men’s singles at the French, Wimbledon and United States championships and teaming with Vic Seixas to take the men’s doubles at the Australian and French events. He had also been ranked No. 1 in 1953.Only Don Budge, who won all four men’s singles majors in 1938, and Rod Laver, who matched that feat in 1962 and 1969, have exceeded Trabert’s 1955 singles accomplishment, a mark that has been matched by several others.Trabert, who won 10 career Grand Slam tournaments overall — five in singles and five in doubles — was described by the tennis journalist and historian Bud Collins as “the all-American boy from Cincinnati with his ginger crew cut, freckles and uncompromisingly aggressive game.”Trabert played on five Davis Cup teams in the 1950s and was later the captain of five American squads.Tennis was largely an amateur affair in Trabert’s heyday. In October 1955, 13 years before the Open era, when pros could compete against amateurs, Jack Kramer signed Trabert to a contract guaranteeing him $75,000 to join his professional tour; over the years the tour also included stars like Pancho Gonzales, Pancho Segura and the Australians Ken Rosewall, Lew Hoad and Frank Sedgman.“I never have — or never would — admit to a weakness, because I don’t think I have a particular weakness,” he told Sports Illustrated in 1955.“I think I can play equally well with any shot,” he continued. “It’s not overconfidence or bragging. I know my capabilities and my limitations. I certainly know that because I’m reasonably big, I can’t be as quick as some of the smaller fellows who run around the court and get a lot of balls back defensively. So, quite simply, my game is that I make up in power what I lack in speed.”He went on to be a tennis commentator for CBS for more than 30 years and was president of the Tennis Hall of Fame from 2001 to 2011.Marion Anthony Trabert was born on Aug. 30, 1930, in Cincinnati, to Arch and Bea Trabert. He began hitting tennis balls at a neighborhood park at age 6. His father, a General Electric sales executive, arranged for him to take lessons from local pros when Tony was 10. Two years later, Bill Talbert, a neighbor 12 years his senior and also a future Hall of Famer, began giving him tips. “I could see in him a duplicate of myself at the same age — an intense desire to be a good player and a willingness to spend the long hours to make the grade,” Talbert wrote in “The Fireside Book of Tennis” (1972, edited by Allison Danzig and Peter Schwed).Trabert won the Ohio scholastic tennis singles title three consecutive years while at Walnut Hills High School in Cincinnati, where he also played basketball.He teamed with Talbert to win the doubles title at the French championship in 1950 and captured the 1951 N.C.A.A. singles tennis title while at the University of Cincinnati.Trabert also played guard for the Bearcats’ basketball team, which went to the National Invitation Tournament at Madison Square Garden in March 1951 (at a time when the tournament carried more prestige than it does today) before losing in the first round.He joined the Navy during the Korean War and served aboard an aircraft carrier.Trabert won the men’s singles at the United States Nationals in 1953 and the French singles in 1954 before his three singles victories at Grand Slam events in 1955.After being defeated by Rosewall in the semifinals of the 1955 Australian singles championships, the first of the four annual Grand Slam tournaments, Trabert won the French championship at Roland Garros, on clay, and then won Wimbledon and the United States Nationals at Forest Hills, both on grass. He did not lose a single set at either of those two tournaments.He also won the 1955 U.S. Indoor and Clay Court titles. In addition to winning the doubles in Paris with Talbert, he won four doubles titles in Grand Slam tournaments with Seixas.Trabert played on America’s Davis Cup teams from 1951 to 1955. He made it to the 1952 event while on a Navy furlough.The United States lost to Australia in the 1951 and 1952 finals, but an especially wrenching defeat came at Melbourne in 1953. The U.S. was leading Australia in the final, 2-1, but Hoad and Rosewall, both in their teens, beat Trabert and Seixas. The Americans did defeat Australia at Sydney in the final the next year.While Trabert was captain of the American squad from 1976 to 1980, he guided two cup winners.His survivors include his wife, Vicki; a son, Mike, and a daughter, Brooke, from his marriage to Shauna Wood; three stepchildren; 14 grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.Looking back on his career, Trabert expressed no regrets about turning pro and disqualifying himself from further Grand Slam events before the arrival of the Open era.“When I won Wimbledon as an amateur, I got a 10-pound certificate, which was worth $27 redeemable at Lilly White’s Sporting Goods store in London,” he told The Florida Times-Union in 2014. “Jack Kramer offered me a guarantee of $75,000 against a percentage of the gate to play on his tour.“I made $125,000 to play 101 matches on five continents over 14 months. People say, ‘Yeah, Tony, but bread and milk was five cents.’ I say, ‘Give me Agassi’s $17 million and I’ll figure out the rest.’”

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง

Baseball, Coaches and Managers, Deaths (Obituaries), Fort Worth Cats (Baseball Team), Minnesota Twins, Minor Leagues, Terwilliger, Wayne
Wayne Terwilliger เสียชีวิตที่ 95 หรือไม่? เบสบอลคือชีวิต (อันยาวนาน) ของเขา


เขาเป็นโค้ชให้เรนเจอร์สเป็นเวลาห้าฤดูกาลด้วยคาถาที่สองกับทีมในช่วงปี 1980 จากนั้นเป็นโค้ชให้กับ Twins Tom Kelly ได้รับแหวนแชมป์เมื่อเขาได้รับรางวัล World Series ในปี 1987 และ 1991 Terwilliger เป็นที่รู้จักในฐานะแฟนเบสบอลส่วนใหญ่ แต่ รวบรวมการอ้างอิงถึงวัฒนธรรมยอดนิยม ในนวนิยายของเขาเรื่อง “Lake Wobegon Summer 1956” (2001) Garrison Keillor ได้พูดถึงสถานีวิทยุแห่งหนึ่งที่อธิบายถึงการตีของทีม Minneapolis Millers ที่ออกจากบ้านไปเล็กน้อยแล้วจึงพูดว่า ผู้ฟัง “ตอนนี้เวย์นเทอร์วิลลิเกอร์มาที่จาน” “ฝูงชน” เขากล่าวเสริม “กลับไปนอนเถอะ” ในบันทึกประจำวันของเธอ “An American Childhood” (1987) แอนนี่ดิลลาร์ดกล่าวว่าแม่ของเธอหลงใหลในชื่อ Terwilliger เมื่อผู้ประกาศข่าวเกมระหว่าง Pittsburgh Pirates และ New York Giants กล่าวว่า “Terwilliger นัดหนึ่ง” ในปีต่อ ๆ มาแม่ของเธอได้เปลี่ยนวลีนี้ให้กลายเป็นเรื่องตลกส่วนตัว “เขาลองไมโครโฟนเขาพูดซ้ำ” Terwilliger bunts one “” Dillard เขียน “ลองใช้ปากกาหรือเครื่องพิมพ์ดีดเขาก็จด” Terwilliger ผู้ประกาศตัวเองตอบสนองต่อ Keillor และ Dillard สะเปะสะปะในบันทึกประจำวันปี 2006 ชื่อเรื่อง: “Terwilliger Bunts One” Willard Wayne Terwilliger เกิดเมื่อวันที่ 27 มิถุนายน พ.ศ. 2468 ในเมืองแคลร์รัฐมิชิแกนบุตรชายของอีวานและดอร์ริสเทอร์วิลลิเกอร์ หลังจากเกิดไม่นานครอบครัวของเขาก็ย้ายไปอยู่ที่ชาร์ลอตต์รัฐมิชิแกนซึ่งพ่อของเขาเป็นเจ้าของบาร์ เขาต่อสู้กับนาวิกโยธินที่ไซปันทิเนียนและอิโวจิมาในสงครามโลกครั้งที่สองจากนั้นเล่นเบสบอลให้กับมหาวิทยาลัยเวสเทิร์นมิชิแกนในปัจจุบันและเซ็นสัญญากับทีมชิคาโกคับส์ในปี 2491 เขาเปิดตัว Cubs ในปี 2492 จากนั้นก็เข้าตี 242 ด้วยการวิ่งกลับบ้าน 10 ครั้งและการขโมย 13 ครั้งในปี 1950 Terwilliger ซื้อขายกับ Dodgers ซึ่งเป็นส่วนหนึ่งของข้อตกลงผู้เล่นหลายคนในเดือนมิถุนายน พ.ศ. 2494 หนึ่งในชัยชนะเล็ก ๆ ของเขาเกิดขึ้นในอีกหนึ่งเดือนต่อมาเมื่อเขาเลือกซิงเกิลฮิตที่ชนะพระคาร์ดินัลของ เซนต์. หลุยส์ที่สนามเอ็บเบ็ตส์ เขาชอบรูปถ่ายที่แสดงให้เห็นว่าแจ็คกี้โรบินสันแสดงความยินดีกับเขาในสนามมานานแล้ว

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง

Basketball, Coronavirus (2019-nCoV), Deaths (Obituaries), Marietta (Ga), NBA TV, Sekou Smith, Turner Broadcasting System Inc
Sekou Smith นักข่าวและนักวิเคราะห์ NBA ที่ได้รับรางวัลเสียชีวิตด้วยวัย 48 ปี


“เรากำลังพูดถึง” 307 ออเบิร์น “คุณสมิ ธ กล่าว “ทุกเช้าไม่ว่าจะเป็นพ่อหรือเซโข่วหรือพี่ชายคนหนึ่งของฉันพวกเราคนหนึ่งส่งข้อความเกี่ยวกับสภาพอากาศหรือสิ่งที่เกิดขึ้น” อัปเดต 28 มกราคม 2564 16:05 น. ETMr. สมิ ธ เริ่มอาชีพนักข่าวในฐานะพนักงานกีฬาพาร์ทไทม์ที่ The Clarion-Ledger ใน Jackson, Miss., ในปี 1994 ขณะที่เป็นนักศึกษาที่ Jackson State University หลังจากจบการศึกษาในปี 1997 เขายังคงทำงานในหนังสือพิมพ์ในฐานะนักข่าวจนกระทั่งเขาย้ายไปที่อินเดียแนโพลิสประเทศอินเดียเพื่อขึ้นปก Pacers ในปี 2544 สำหรับ The Indianapolis Star เขาเข้าร่วม Atlanta Journal-Constitution เพื่อปกปิดเหยี่ยวในปี 2548 หลังจากที่นาย Triche กระตุ้นให้เขาสมัคร ในเวลาเดียวกันมิสเตอร์สมิ ธ เชื่อมต่อกับนักเขียนหลายคนโดยเฉพาะผู้ที่เคยเข้าเรียนในวิทยาลัยและมหาวิทยาลัยสีดำที่มีคุณค่าทางประวัติศาสตร์เช่นมิสเตอร์ลีและมาร์คสเปียร์สนักเขียนเอ็นบีเอจากรายการ The Undefeat ของ ESPN ที่จูบมิสเตอร์สมิ ธ ในขณะที่ปกปิดนักเก็ต ที่ The Denver Post เมื่อประมาณ 20 ปีที่แล้ว คำพูดที่นุ่มนวลและอารมณ์ขันของ Mr. Smith ทำให้เพื่อนของเขาหลงใหล “ เขาอาจเป็นนักแสดงตลกได้ถ้าเขาต้องการ” สเปียร์สเขียนในแถลงการณ์ถึง The Times “เขาเป็นคนฉลาดที่มีซิงเกิ้ลไลน์เฮฮาเหมือนอดีตนักแสดงตลกโรบินแฮร์ริส” ในปี 2009 เขาได้รับการว่าจ้างจาก Turner Sports ซึ่งเป็นเจ้าภาพ NBA TV ในตำแหน่งนักวิเคราะห์และนักเขียนออนแอร์อาวุโสของ NBA.com ที่นั่นมิสเตอร์สมิ ธ เขียนคอลัมน์รายสัปดาห์ The MVP Ladder และเริ่มบล็อกและพ็อดคาสท์ “Hang Time” ของ NBA ซึ่งเขาได้พูดคุยกับผู้เล่นนักข่าวและโค้ชเกี่ยวกับบาสเก็ตบอลอาชีพ นายสมิ ธ ยังรอดชีวิตจากภรรยาของเขาเฮเธอร์พูลเลียมร่วมกับน้องสาวของเขา ลูกชายของเขากาเบรียลและคาเมรอนลูกสาวรีไวล์ พ่อของฉัน; พี่สาว Charmel Mack และ Misti Stanton และพี่ชายของเขาเอริคนาย Smith มีความสามารถในการแสดงความคิดเห็นที่กระตุ้นความคิดเช่นเมื่อเขาให้ Mr. Lee และ Mr. Spears อภิปรายเกี่ยวกับการเสียชีวิตในพอดคาสต์ของเขาหลังจากการเสียชีวิตของ Kobe Bryant เมื่อปีที่แล้ว

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง

Basketball, Deaths (Obituaries), Harthorne, NBA Championship, New York Knicks, Wingo
Harthorne Wingo, 1970 Knick ที่มีชื่อมากมายเสียชีวิตที่ 73


คำพูดใด ๆ ของ Harthorne Wingo ซึ่งเป็นเขตสงวนยอดนิยมของ New York Knicks ในปี 1970 มักเริ่มต้นด้วยชื่อของเขา ชื่อแรกของเขาคือ Harthorne ไม่ใช่ Hawthorne เนื่องจากมักสะกดผิด สำหรับนามสกุลของเขาแฟน ๆ เคยพูดว่า (“Wing-o!, Wing-o!”) ที่ Madison Square Garden เพื่อขอให้ Knicks Coach Red Holzman ใส่เขาในเกม ชื่อของมัน “เป็นของบทกวีหรือเพลง” Dave Anderson คอลัมนิสต์ด้านกีฬาของ New York Times เขียนเมื่อปี 1973 “หรืออาจจะอยู่ในพิพิธภัณฑ์เช่น Wingo มันก็เคยเป็นนกขนาดใหญ่ที่หายไปแล้วในตอนนี้” Wingo ซึ่งเป็นก้าวกระโดดสูงที่ยืนได้ 6 ฟุต 6 ไม่เคยเป็นนิทรรศการของพิพิธภัณฑ์ แต่ Beastie Boys ใช้ชื่อของเขาในเพลงปี 1989 “Lay It on Me”: “ข้อมูลล่าสุดเกี่ยวกับศัพท์แสงฮิปฮอป (ไม่ใช่ผู้ชาย) / New York Knick ที่ฉันชอบคือ Harthorne Wingo” Wingo เข้าร่วมกับ Knicks ในฐานะตัวสำรองในช่วงฤดูกาล 1972-73 เมื่อพวกเขาคว้าแชมป์ NBA สมัยที่สอง (และครั้งสุดท้ายจนถึงปัจจุบัน) เหลือสำรองอีกหนึ่งสามฤดูกาล เขามีฤดูกาลที่ดีที่สุดในปี 2517-2575 โดยเฉลี่ย 20.6 นาที 7.4 คะแนนและ 5.6 รีบาวน์ต่อเกม “เขาเป็นผู้เล่นระยะขอบม้านั่งที่มีการยิงนอกรีตที่เขาใช้อย่างสมบูรณ์แบบเพื่อพลังงานและการฟื้นตัวของเขา “นักเตะรักเขาจริง ๆ เช่นเดียวกับแฟน ๆ ” มาร์ฟอัลเบิร์ตผู้จัดรายการวิทยุของนิกส์กล่าวระหว่างวิงโกกับทีม หลังจากทำคะแนนและรีบาวน์เพื่อตัดผู้นำทีมบอสตันเซลติกส์ในเกมเมื่อเดือนพฤศจิกายน 1973 ทอมเฮย์นสันโค้ชของเซลติกบอกกับเดอะไทม์สว่า “วิงโก้ไปกินกล้วยที่นั่น” เขาเสียชีวิตเมื่อวันที่ 20 มกราคมที่โรงพยาบาลเขาอายุ 73 ปี และป่วยเป็นโรคปอดอุดกั้นเรื้อรังมานานแล้ว Jackie Wingo Wood ลูกพี่ลูกน้องของเขากล่าว Harthorne Nathaniel Wingo เกิดเมื่อวันที่ 9 กันยายน พ.ศ. 2490 ที่เมืองไทรออนรัฐนอร์ทแคโรไลนารัฐนิวยอร์กเขาเป็นหนึ่งในบุตร 14 คนของ Nathaniel Harthorne Wingo คนงานก่อสร้างและ Jessie Mae (Gary) Wingo, Harthorne ซึ่งเป็นส่วนหนึ่งของชั้นเรียนแรกที่โรงเรียน Tryon High School ซึ่งเขาเรียนมัธยมปลายเขาเป็นคนผิวดำคนเดียวในทีมบาสเก็ตบอลของโรงเรียนที่ชนะตำแหน่งการประชุม และหลังจากนั้นหนึ่งปีที่ Friendship Junior College ใน Rock Hill, SC เขาก็เล่น บาสเก็ตบอลในการแข่งขันชิงแชมป์อุตสาหกรรมที่ Spartanburg, SC จากนั้นเดินทางไปนิวยอร์ก เขาเล่นในลีกบาสเก็ตบอลฤดูหนาวในปี 1968 จากนั้นอย่างน้อยหนึ่งฤดูร้อนกับ Rucker Pro League ในตำนานใน Haarlem ซึ่งมีผู้เล่นท้องถิ่นมืออาชีพและมีความสามารถเข้าร่วมแข่งขัน “สำหรับฉันแล้วมันเหมือนกับการพาม้าไปที่ทุ่งโล่งและปล่อยมันไป” Wingo กล่าวกับ PolkSports ซึ่งเป็นไซต์ที่เกี่ยวข้องกับกีฬาในเขตที่เขาเติบโตมา นิกส์ได้เรียนรู้เกี่ยวกับเขาเนื่องจากความสำเร็จของเขาที่ Rucker แต่ก่อนที่เขาจะเซ็นสัญญาเขาเล่นให้กับ Harlem Magi และ Allentown Jets Championship ที่เล็กกว่าในเพนซิลเวเนียซึ่งเขากลายเป็นดารา เมื่อนิกส์เซ็นสัญญากับเขาในเดือนกุมภาพันธ์ 2516 เขาได้เข้าร่วมบัญชีรายชื่อที่รวมถึง Hall of Famers Willis Reed, Walt Frazier, Dave DeBusschere, Bill Bradley, Jerry Lucas และ Earl Monroe “เช่นเดียวกับชื่อของเขาเขาเป็นคนที่มีเอกลักษณ์เฉพาะตัว” Frazier กล่าวในแถลงการณ์ “เขามีความทะเยอทะยานทะเยอทะยานและมีบุคลิกที่ติดเชื้อไม่เพียง แต่เป็นที่นิยมในหมู่เพื่อนร่วมทีมของเขาเท่านั้น แต่ยังรวมถึง Knicks Nation ด้วย” นิกส์ลาออกจาก Wingo ใน ศ. 2519 และเขายังคงเล่นในอิตาลีสวิตเซอร์แลนด์และอเมริกาใต้และหลังจากเลิกเล่นบาสเก็ตบอลในปี 2526 เขาประสบปัญหาทางการเงินและการใช้สารเสพติดอ้างอิงจาก PolkSports ทำให้ Rosemary Wingo Palmer น้องสาวของเขาและพี่ชายในช่วงต้นอาชีพของเขา Wingo พูด ของเพลง “Wing-o!” “ มันทำให้ฉันมีชีวิตขึ้นมาและฉันต้องการทำงานให้หนักขึ้น” เขาบอกกับ The Times ในปี 1973“ มันเหมือนกับว่ามีคนเสนอรางวัลให้ฉันตลอดหลายปีที่พยายามทำที่นี่”

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง